Reno Dentists: Is Your Toothache a Warning Sign?

toothache 2Oftentimes, toothaches are nothing more than fleeting sensitivities, but other times, they can be indicative of a serious problem with your oral health. So how do you know when to seek dental care for a toothache? Below, your Reno dentists, Dr. William Wager and Dr. Brian Evans, help you determine whether or not your toothache is cause for concern. Continue reading “Reno Dentists: Is Your Toothache a Warning Sign?”

Getting To Know Your Tooth Enamel

Tooth enamel is one of the four major tissues that make up teeth. Enamel is the hard outer surface that protects the underlying layers. It is also the hardest and most mineralized substance in your body.

Ninety-six percent of tooth enamel is composed of minerals, while the remaining percentage consists of water and organic material. The main mineral in enamel is hydroxylapatite which is also known as crystalline calcium phosphate.

The Role of Tooth Enamel

The main role of tooth enamel is to protect the soft layer of dentin. Enamel also serves as a hard surface for chewing, grinding, and crushing food.

Enamel is semi-translucent and porous. Eating dark foods and drinking dark beverages, such as red wines, coffee, or soda, can cause the enamel to discolor and stain. Smoking, age, and certain medications also cause tooth stains. A beautiful smile is a white smile, so if your teeth are stained, consider professional, safe teeth whitening prescribed by Dr. Wager and Dr. Evans.

Enamel Erosion

Even though enamel is the hardest substance in your body, it is susceptible to damage. The food you eat contains sugars and starches, and when these components mix with saliva, they form acid. The acid extracts minerals from tooth enamel, weakening it. Then bacteria invade and cause decay, or cavities. Acidic foods, like citrus fruits, tomatoes, and carbonated beverages, also erode tooth enamel. Your tooth enamel doesn’t remain soft forever. Saliva will remineralize and re-harden the enamel within 30 minutes to an hour after you stop eating and drinking. Continue reading “Getting To Know Your Tooth Enamel”

Beautiful Dental Crowns in Reno NV

Sometimes a filling is not strong enough to repair a tooth. In cases of deep decay, chipping, or fracture, dental crowns (aka caps) can often provide stability and repair the functionality of teeth. We’re Dr. William Wager and Dr. Brian Evans, and we offer beautiful dental crowns in our Reno, NV, dental office.

After we have determined that you require a dental crown, we will choose the best option for you. We offer porcelain, metal (gold), porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) crowns. Porcelain crowns mimic the color and opacity of natural teeth, and we will select the color that matches your teeth. Because porcelain crowns are not as strong as our other options, we place them on front teeth. In cases where teeth are under high pressure—like back teeth, or front teeth in patients with bruxism (nighttime grinding)—we will place gold or PFM crowns, which are much stronger than porcelain alone.

You will need to come to our office twice for crown placement. During the first visit, we will prepare the tooth for the crown, take dental impressions, and send the impressions to a dental lab that will make your restoration. Once we receive the crown from the lab, you will come in for a final adjustment and we will cement the crown in place.

If you are interested in dental crowns or other restorative dental procedures, please call Wager Evans Dental at (775) 800-4845. We offer restorative, preventive, and cosmetic dental services to patients in Reno, Lawton, Spanish Springs, and Sparks, NV.

The Connection Between Gum Disease and Stroke

At Wager Evans Dental, we believe in a strong connection between your oral health and your overall health. It’s clear that maintaining oral health is essential to optimal wellness, and this month is the perfect time to bring attention to one of the reasons this connection is so important.

The month of May is National Stroke Awareness Month. While you may wonder what stroke awareness is doing on a dental blog, it’s important to know that strokes are much more closely related to your oral health than you may have thought.

In addition to being linked to health issues like tooth loss, osteoporosis, diabetes, heart disease, and Alzheimer’s, gum disease is a leading risk factor for strokes.

Researchers have been trying to prove this connection for years, and, last month, the Seoul National University College of Dentistry in Seoul, North Korea, found that gum disease is twice as likely to cause strokes than it is to cause diabetes. Also, gum disease is equally as likely to cause strokes as it is to cause high blood pressure.

So, where does this connection come from? A stroke occurs when a ruptured blood vessel or impaired blood flow causes brain hemorrhaging (bleeding) or when a clot blocks a blood vessel. Dr. Wu, a stroke expert from the State University of New York at Buffalo, says that bacteria are to blame. Harmful bacteria enter the bloodstream from the mouth, stimulating blood clotting, damaging the lining of blood vessels, and increasing the risk of stroke.

The bottom line: take care of your dental health to reduce your risk of gum disease and stroke.  The best way to protect yourself is by having regular dental exams and cleanings every six months and brushing and flossing daily at home.

We’re Dr. Brian Evans and Dr. William Wager, and the health and wellbeing of our patients is our top priority. We want to help you maintain optimal oral health and a high quality of life. For more information about gum disease, oral hygiene, or to schedule an appointment, call our dental office in Reno, Nevada, at (775) 800-4845.